There’s a difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day, but not everyone is entirely sure what that difference is! CNN wrote a good article explaining the difference, check it out below!

Memorial Day: Celebrated the last Monday in May, Memorial Day is the holiday set aside to pay tribute to those who died serving in the military.
The website for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs recounts the start of Memorial Day this way:
“Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.”
The passage of the National Holiday Act of 1971 by Congress made it an official holiday.

Veterans Day: This federal holiday falls on November 11 and is designated as a day to honor all who have served in the military. According to Military.com, Veterans Day began as Armistice Day to honor the end of World War I, which officially took place on November 11, 1918.
“In 1954, after having been through both World War II and the Korean War, the 83rd U.S. Congress — at the urging of the veterans service organizations — amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting the word “Veterans,” the site says. “With the approval of this legislation on June 1, 1954, November 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.”

There is a really neat website that will tell you all about Memorial Day and you can check out all the history and ways to celebrate Memorial Day here!

Our word of the day today was: malleable
adjective || MAL-ee-uh-bul

This means: capable of being extended or shaped by beating with a hammer or by the pressure of rollers, capable of being altered or controlled by outside forces or influences, or having a capacity for adaptive change.

There is a hint about the origins of malleable in its first definition. The earliest uses of the word, which first appeared in English in the 14th century, referred primarily to metals that could be reshaped by beating with a hammer. The Middle English word malliable comes to us from Medieval Latin malleabilis, which in turn derives from the Latin verb malleare, meaning “to hammer.” Malleare itself was created from the Latin word for “hammer”: malleus. If you have guessed that maul and mallet, other English words for specific types of hammers, can also be traced back to malleus, you have hit the nail on the head.

Thanks for listening!
-Lilly

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